Wetlands

 

Southern Cypress Provincial Park contains several relatively flat areas with small lakes, tarns and marshy places. These wetlands provide habitat for a large number of plant and animal species that require moisture and abundant light. The best known is the wheelchair-accessible Yew Lake area in Cypress Bowl. Numerous small lakes and ponds dot Black Mountain Plateau, many of which can be seen along the Baden-Powell Trail toward Eagle Bluff. The largest is Cabin Lake, named for a cabin that once stood here. A few small lakes and ponds can be found on Mt. Strachan, the largest of which is Strachan Lake, west of Upper Collins ski run. Hollyburn’s several small lakes include Lost and Blue Gentian lakes in the park’s southeast corner, and man-made West Lake and First Lake (at Hollyburn Lodge). Five other small numbered (man-made) lakes can be seen from the Hollyburn Peak Trail. The Heather Lakes are just below Hollyburn Peak.


Many of West Vancouver’s larger streams originate in the park’s wetlands. Several of these streams are fish-bearing in their lower reaches. The headwaters of Cypress Creek are on Black and Hollyburn mountains, with tributaries flowing from Yew Lake and from Frank Lake, in the saddle between Strachan and Hollyburn mountains. Dick Creek on Black Mountain supplies water to West Vancouver’s Eagle (Dick) Lake, which provides 30% of the District’s water. Nelson Creek also originates on the Plateau. Brothers Creek flows down to Burrard Inlet from Sixth Lake on Hollyburn Ridge. Marr Creek originates at First Lake, MacDonald in wetlands east of First Lake, and Lawson at Blue Gentian Lake.

 

Pond, Yew Meadows,

Laura Parkinson photo


For more information, click here


Hollyburn Ridge wetland plants list / report, July 2009 click here


Wetland plants observed on Black Mountain, July 28, 2010, click here

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